Resources: Reports & Studies

Reports & Studies by Issue


Reports & Studies by Country

How Do You Sell Death?

The tobacco industry is constantly changing its marketing tactics to attract new customers and keep tobacco users loyal to particular brands.This document illustrates these tactics including traditional paid radio or magazine advertisements to sophisticated new uses of the internet, mobile phones, and other media.

“Tobacco Advertising and Promotion,” Tobacco Control in Developing Countries

Saffer H. (2000) Chapter discusses the impact of tobacco advertising and promotion and the impact of tobacco marketing bans on overall consumption.

Banning tobacco promotion: ethical and civil liberties issues. Action on Smoking or Health

ASH argues that tobacco is a highly unusual special case, with very serious health implications. This justifies intervention to control the marketing of the product, and if a Government receives a mandate to act, we as a society have expressed a collective wish to see the tobacco industry restrained.(1997)

The Role of the Media in Promoting and Reducing Tobacco Use. National Cancer Institute

Monograph 19 provides a critical, scientific review and synthesis of the current evidence regarding the power of the media, both to encourage and to discourage tobacco use. It is the most current and comprehensive summary of the scientific literature on media communication in tobacco promotion and tobacco control. (2008)

How Eliminating the Global Illicit Cigarette Trade Would Increase Tax Revenue and Save Lives

This report updates existing global estimates of the illicit cigarette trade, based on recent data, and estimates how many lives could be saved worldwide by eliminating it. The results highlight the enormous scale of the global illicit cigarette trade, the huge sums of money that governments are losing because of it, and the significant number of lives that could be saved in the future if the illicit trade were eliminated.

Understanding and Measuring Cigarette Tax Avoidance and Evasion: A Mythological Guide

This guide updates and expands on the World Bank Toolkit on how to estimate the scope of tobacco smuggling in a country.

Illegal Pathways to Illegal Profits-The Cigarette Companies and International Smuggling

This report presents some key evidence and information about the major cigarette companies’ involvement in international cigarette smuggling in order to help readers develop a better understanding of the problem and how it can best be addressed to improve the finances and public health of the world’s countries.

Tobacconomics: How big tobacco uses dodgy data to “throw sand in the gears” of Global Health Policy

ASH-UK (2011) Report contains a section titled “Raising the alarm about counterfeit and smuggled tobacco” which outlines industry arguments using illicit trade and evidence based counter arguments.

Progress in combating cigarette smuggling: Controlling the supply chain

This paper presents the experience over the last decade of three countries, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom, which shows that tobacco smuggling can be successfully tackled. Evidence strongly suggests that the key to controlling smuggling is controlling the supply chain, and that the supply chain is controlled to a great extent by the tobacco industry.

Framework Convention Alliance: Illicit Trade

Policy papers and recommendations for the FCTC illicit trade protocol from the Framework Convention Alliance.

Judge Kessler Final Opinion

The 1663-page final opinion of Judge Kessler in the US government’s racketeering case against the tobacco industry in which tobacco companies were found guilty of misleading the public about the harmfulness of light and low-tar products.

The Verdict Is In: Findings from United States v. Philip Morris

The Tobacco Control Legal Consortium presents verbatim excerpts from Judge Gladys Kessler’s Findings from United States v. Philip Morris, to equip policymakers, health advocates and the public with the facts about the tobacco companies and their executives: what they knew, when they knew it, and how they continue to mislead the public and manipulate public policy.

SACTob Conclusions on Health Claims Derived from ISO/FTC Method to Measure Cigarette Yield

World Health Organization. (2003) 

Risks Associated with Smoking Cigarettes with Low Machine-Measured Yields of Tar and Nicotine.

Reports from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute.

Center for Strategic and International Studies: Spotlighting the NCD Problem

Rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have been rising in all countries. Nearly 80% of the world’s chronic disease-related deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. This short video explainis the rising chronic disease epidemic and the importance of the UN High Level Meeting.  .

The Lancet: Priority actions for the non-communicable disease crisis

The Lancet NCD Action Group and the NCD Alliance propose five overarching priority actions for the response to the non-communicable disease crisis. The most urgent and immediate priority is tobacco control.  If widely adopted and implemented, tobacco control interventions will achieve the global goal of reducing NCD death rates by 2% per year, averting tens of millions of premature deaths in this decade.

NCD Alliance Briefing Paper on Tobacco Use and NCDs

The NCD Alliance calls for accelerated implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. As a sustainable investment, with proven results, it will contribute to producing a healthier, more able and productive global population, and will increase the benefits of investment already being made towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

The rise of chronic noncommunicable diseases: an impending disaster

Opening remarks by Dr. Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization, at the WHO Global Forum: Addressing the Challenge of Noncommunicable Diseases, Moscow, Russian Federation, 27 April 2011 .

WHO: Global Status Report on NCDs

This first report on the current status of noncommunicable diseases provides a road map for reversing the epidemic by strengthening national and global monitoring and surveillance, scaling up the implementation of evidence-based measures to reduce risk factors like tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and harmful alcohol use, and improving access to cost-effective healthcare interventions to prevent complications, disabilities and premature death.

Evidence Supporting the Effectiveness of Mass Media Public Education Campaigns

Global Dialogue compiled and summarized data supporting the effectiveness of public education/mass media campaigns, including an explanation of the key role that campaigns play in comprehensive tobacco control programs. (May 2011)

Lessons Learned from Stop Smoking Campaigns: An Overview of Evidence-Based Recommendations

Global Dialogue combined an international literature review, conducted by Johns Hopkins’ Institute for Global Tobacco Control, with a synthesis of unpublished stop smoking campaign results.

Lessons Learned Internationally from Digital Media Campaigns

This document includes 26 campaign case studies from 11 countries and the European Union, plus overall lessons learned regarding what makes digital media campaigns effective in tobacco control.

Lessons Learned Globally: Secondhand Smoke Mass Media Campaigns

This document, released in January of 2010, synthesizes data from secondhand smoke campaigns around the world, providing lessons learned about the process and content of developing and implementing mass media campaigns designed to reduce exposure to secondhand smoke, either through policies or through individual behavior change.

United States (Vermont): direct mail Quit Line campaign

In May 2004, the Vermont Department of Health undertook a Three-Phase direct-mail campaign that concluded in March 2007.  The target audience for all Three Phases of the campaign was smokers aged 18 and older.  To reach this audience effectively, the First Phase targeted all Vermont residents, mailing to 80% of all households in the state.

United States (Minnesota): Tick Tock college student campaign

The ultimate goal of the campaign was to achieve a statistically significant reduction in the rate of smoking (i.e., reduction in smoking “some days” or “every day”).  This campaign was designed to appeal to both male and female college students at universities throughout Minnesota who were between the ages of 18 and 24.

Norway: 4-phase youth prevention and adult cessation campaign

This report outlines the results of a 2003 campaign by he Norwegian Directorate for Health and Social Affairs (now called the Norwegian Directorate of Health or NDH), a part of the Norwegian Government, to reduce youth smoking rates (daily smoking) by 50%, from 28% in 2002 to 14% by 2007.

New Zealand:  Face the Facts education and awareness campaign

Face the Facts was launched in April 2009 with the overriding goal of putting tobacco ‘on the radar’ of New Zealanders and heightening tobacco’s priority as a health issue. The approach chosen focused on dispelling some of the myths that prevent people from quitting smoking or resisting taking up smoking, by presenting a series of facts about smoking.

Israel: The Shy secondhand smoke campaign

Specific campaign goals included raising awareness of the harmful effects of forced exposure to second-hand smoke, instilling norms that the law to prohibit smoking in public places should be respected, and motivating the public to safeguard its right to clean air.

Canada (Newfoundland): It’s Your Call stop smoking campaign

The main objective of the three-month ‘It’s Your Call’ campaign was to increase awareness of, and access to, provincial smoking cessation services in an effort to reduce the prevalence of smoking.

Lessons Learned Globally: Secondhand Smoke Mass Media Campaigns

This document, released in January of 2010, synthesizes data from secondhand smoke campaigns around the world, providing lessons learned about the process and content of developing and implementing mass media campaigns designed to reduce exposure to secondhand smoke, either through policies or through individual behavior change.

Global Map of Smoke-Free Policies

This document maps out the smoke-free policies of the vast majority of the countries that have ratified the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).

WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2009: Implementing smoke-free environments

The WHO provides a comprehensive overview of the evidence base for protecting people from the harms of second-hand tobacco smoke through legislation and enforcement. There is a special focus on the status of implementation of smoke-free policies, with detailed data collected for the first time ever on a global basis at both the national level and for large subnational jurisdictions.

The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General

This twenty-ninth report of the Surgeon General documents the serious and deadly health effects of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke. Secondhand smoke is a major cause of disease, including lung cancer and coronary heart disease, in healthy nonsmokers.

Policy Recommendations on Protection from Exposure to Second-Hand Tobacco Smoke

Evidence consistently demonstrates not only that smoke-free environments are enforceable, but that they are popular and become more so following implementation. The World Health Organization encourages Member States to follow these recommendations and apply lessons learned to advance the goals of public health through legislated implementation of 100% smoke-free environments in workplaces and public places.

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Smoke-free Policies

This publication represents the views and opinions of an IARC Working Group on Evaluating the effectiveness of smoke-free policies which met in Lyon, France, 31 March - 5 April 2008

Putting the FCTC Article 6 Guidelines to Work

This presentation explains the WHO FCTC Article 6 Guidelines for non-technical audiences and provides tips on how to use the Guidelines for advocacy.

Undermining Government Tax Policies

Common strategies employed by the tobacco industry in response to tobacco tax increases. Updated report by the Economics of Tobacco Control Project, 2016.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Pakistan

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease describes the tobacco situation in Pakistan and makes recommendations for future tobacco tax policy in a country with one of the largest populations of tobacco users in the world.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in the Philippines

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease illustrates how raising tobacco excise taxes and prices is an effective tool to reduce tobacco use and prevalence and should be an important component of the overall tobacco control environment to reduce the smoking rate in the Philippines, one of the largest consumers of tobacco in the Western Pacific Region.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Bangladesh

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease describes the tobacco situation in Bangladesh and makes recommendations for future tobacco tax policy in one of the largest tobacco consuming countries in the world.

Tobacco Taxation and Its Potential Impact in China

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease provides evidence-based policy analysis on the use of taxation as a key tobacco control instrument in China, which has the world’s highest number of smoking-attributable deaths.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Poland

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease illustrates how raising tobacco excise taxes and prices is an effective tool to reduce tobacco use and prevalence and should be an important component of the overall tobacco control environment to reduce Poland’s high adult and youth tobacco use prevalence.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Mexico

International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease provides a comprehensive analysis of the tobacco market in Mexico and the viability of using taxation as a strategy to limit smoking, save lives, and raise tax revenues. (2010)

Economics of Tobacco Taxation in Russia

Tobacco-related diseases are responsible for between 330,000 and 400,000 premature deaths in Russia each year and contribute substantially to the country’s declining life expectancy and population decrease.The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease examines the potential of using cigarette taxation as an effective tobacco control measure to reverse these unfavorable trends, taking into account Russian historical and socioeconomic perspectives.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in India

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease examines the economic and policy dimensions of tobacco taxation as a mechanism for tobacco control in India, the country with the second largest population of tobacco users in the world.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Egypt

This report by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease describes the tobacco environment and current tobacco control policies in Egypt and presents evidence on the effects of prices on cigarette demand. Estimates based on cigarette demand in the 1990s and 2000s are used to project the impact of the recent cigarette tax increases on cigarette consumption, cigarette excise tax revenues, smoking prevalence and future deaths from smoking.

Taxation of Cigarettes in the Bloomberg Initiative Countries: Overview of Policy Issues and Proposal

In addition to increasing the excise rate(s) on cigarettes, reforming the excise regime itself may be an important tobacco control measure. Emil M. Sunley outlines specific considerations in designing a cigarette excise regime and reviews and make recommendations for excise regimes in the Bloomberg Initiative countries.

An Analysis of Cigarette Affordability

Tobacco control economists have consistently promoted excise tax increases as an appropriate and effective tobacco control strategy.The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease presents the latest affordability statistics and trends in cigarette affordability and addresses certain methodological issues, especially regarding the measurement of income, when calculating affordability measures.

A Modern Economic View of Tobacco Taxation

International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease presents a clear and strong case for using tobacco taxation as both a means of revenue raising and a tool of public health.

Taxation of Cigarettes in the Bloomberg Initiative Countries

This paper outlines specific considerations in designing a cigarette excise regime. It reviews the excise regimes in the Bloomberg Initiative countries and makes recommendations of how these regimes could be reformed taking into account international best practices and the starting point for the reform.

India: The Tax Treatment of Bidis

Bidis are under-taxed compared to cigarettes. Taking into account the health risks of each, and therefore, on health grounds, a strong case can be made for increasing the excise burden on bidis. Emil Sunley, one of the world’s leading experts on tobacco taxation, shows that taxes on bidis should increase, and he lays out a rational, detailed plan for how to do so

Taxation (including smuggling control)

The World Health Organization presents evidence from low-, middle- and high-income countries that shows how the increase in the price of tobacco products is an effective strategy to reduce demand. Higher prices induce tobacco users to quit and prevent other individuals from starting.

Curbing the epidemic: Governments and the economics of tobacco control

By 2030, tobacco is expected to be the single biggest cause of death worldwide, accounting for about 10 million deaths per year. The report presented by the WHO and the World Bank covers key issues that most societies and policymakers face when they think about tobacco or its control and assesses the expected consequences of tobacco control for health, for economies, and for individuals. It demonstrates that the economic fears that have deterred policymakers from taking action are largely unfounded.

Economic policies for tobacco control in developing countries

Since lower socioeconomic groups usually smoke more, they also contribute more to total cigarette tax collection. Thus, those who can afford it least contribute the most in terms of tobacco taxes. This means that tobacco taxes are regressive. However, tobacco tax increases are likely to be progressive, decreasing the relative tax incidence on the poor, vis-à-vis the rich.

Price and tax policies (in relation to Article 6 of the Convention)

This technical report by the WHO Tobacco Free Initiative provides evidence that proves the effectiveness of tobacco tax and price increases in reducing tobacco use. an overview of existing tobacco-product taxes and tax structures around the world, as well as a description of the revenue potential of higher tobacco-product taxes and how this revenue may be used to support other tobacco-control interventions and health-promotion activities.

Tobacco Taxation in Vietnam

This report describes the tobacco taxation in Vietnam, evaluates its potential impact on reducing tobacco use and generating revenue.

Economics of Tobacco Taxation in Ukraine

This report describes the tobacco taxation in Ukraine, evaluates its potential impact on reducing tobacco use and generating revenue.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Turkey

This report describes the tobacco taxation in Turkey, evaluates its potential impact on reducing tobacco use and generating revenue.

Cigarette Package Health Warnings: International Status Report

The Canadian Cancer Society provides an international overview ranking 175 countries/jurisdictions based on warning size, and lists countries/jurisdictions that have finalized requirements for picture-based warnings.

Sifting the Evidence: Gender and tobacco control

The progression of the worldwide tobacco epidemic varies across the gender divide. In “Sifting the evidence: Gender and tobacco control” the World Health Organization Tobacco-Free Initiative examines the role of gender in tobacco use, gender and health impacts, and gender dependent responses to cessation efforts.

Women and Health: Today’s evidence tomorrow’s agenda

Women’s health has long been a concern for WHO but today it has become an urgent priority. This report explains why. Using current data, it takes stock of what we know now about the health of women throughout their lives and across the different regions of the world.

Women and Smoking: U.S. Surgeon General’s Report (2001)

The World Health Organization presents a composite overview of smoking and health issues among women and girls in the United States. The report summarzes tobacco use patterns among women, factors associated with starting and continuing to smoke, the health consequences of smoking, tobacco marketing targeted at women, and cessation and prevention interventions.

Deadly in Pink

The tobacco industry has a long history of developing cigarette brands and marketing campaigns that target women and girls, with devastating consequences for women’s health. In the last two years, the industry has launched its most aggressive marketing campaigns aimed at women and girls in over a decade. 

Designed for Addiction

This report describes key ways in which tobacco companies design and manipulate their products to attract new youth smokers, create and sustain addiction, mislead consumers to think that they are reducing their risk of disease and make it more difficult for users to quit. In addition, as the latest Surgeon General’s report found, the design changes during the past 50 years have also made cigarettes even more dangerous.

Standardised Packaging for Tobacco Products: Recent evidence from Australia and United Kingdom
The Hammond Review: Standardised Packaging of Tobacco Products Evidence Review
The Chantler Review: Standardised packaging of tobacco
The University of Stirling Review: Plain tobacco packaging : A systematic review
Special supplement to Tobacco Control on the implementation and evaluation of Australia’s plain pack
Australia’s post implementation review
WHO: Tuberculosis and Tobacco

Data from the World Health Association illustrates the strong association between tobacco use and tuberculosis. The WHO recommends policies and actions to combat this public heath epidemic. (2009)

Global Map of Smoke-Free Policies

This document maps out the smoke-free policies of the vast majority of the countries that have ratified the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).

WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2009: Implementing smoke-free environments

The WHO provides a comprehensive overview of the evidence base for protecting people from the harms of second-hand tobacco smoke through legislation and enforcement. There is a special focus on the status of implementation of smoke-free policies, with detailed data collected for the first time ever on a global basis at both the national level and for large subnational jurisdictions.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Bangladesh

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease describes the tobacco situation in Bangladesh and makes recommendations for future tobacco tax policy in one of the largest tobacco consuming countries in the world.

Bangladesh: Global Adult Tobacco Survey

The Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) is a nationally representative household survey of men and women aged 15 years or above designed to produce internationally comparable data on tobacco use and tobacco control measures using a standardized questionnaire, sample design, data collection and management procedures.

Appetite for Nicotine: An Economic Analysis of Tobacco Control in Bangladesh

This study estimates the economic issues related to tobacco. Cigarette and bidi producction in Bangladesh have been increasing since 1980. Discusses prevalence, impact on health and economy. Written by Ali, Zulfiqar, Rahman, Atiur, and Rahman, Taifur, November 2003.

Global Adult Tobacco Survey (Brazil)

The Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) is the global standard for systematically monitoring adult tobacco use (smoked or smokeless tobacco) and tracking key tobacco control indicators.

Tobacco Industry Profile – Latin America
Tobacco Taxation and Its Potential Impact in China

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease provides evidence-based policy analysis on the use of taxation as a key tobacco control instrument in China, which has the world’s highest number of smoking-attributable deaths.

The Chinese Tobacco Market and Industry Profile

The Chinese government plays conflicting roles in China’s tobacco sector, as both owner and regulator of the industry. The government is mandated to oversee the growth of the China National Tobacco Corporation (CNTC), the world’s single largest producer of cigarettes. At the same time, it has a responsibility to protect public health by reducing tobacco use and tobacco smoke exposure, according to China’s obligations under the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).

China National Tobacco Corporation and Philip Morris International’s Partnership

In 2005, PMI and the China National Tobacco Import and Export Group Corp. (CNTIEGC) established a 50-50 joint venture to offer a range of Chinese brands on the global market, expand the export of tobacco products and tobacco materials from China and explore other business opportunities.

Egypt: Global Adult Tobacco Survey

The Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) in Egypt is a nationally representative household survey of men and women aged 15 years and above. It is designed to produce internationally comparable data on tobacco use and tobacco control measures using a standardized questionnaire, sample design, data collection, aggregation and analysis procedures.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Egypt

This report by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease describes the tobacco environment and current tobacco control policies in Egypt and presents evidence on the effects of prices on cigarette demand. Estimates based on cigarette demand in the 1990s and 2000s are used to project the impact of the recent cigarette tax increases on cigarette consumption, cigarette excise tax revenues, smoking prevalence and future deaths from smoking.

“Smoking and Death in India” Centre for Global Health Research

Results from a CGHR study published in the New England Journal of Medicine find that India is in the midst of a catastrophic epidemic of smoking deaths. Tobacco smoking is expected that nearly one million deaths each year in India during the 2010s – including one in five of all male deaths and one in 20 of all female deaths between 30-69.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in India

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease examines the economic and policy dimensions of tobacco taxation as a mechanism for tobacco control in India, the country with the second largest population of tobacco users in the world.

India: The Tax Treatment of Bidis

Bidis are under-taxed compared to cigarettes. Taking into account the health risks of each, and therefore, on health grounds, a strong case can be made for increasing the excise burden on bidis. Emil Sunley, one of the world’s leading experts on tobacco taxation, shows that taxes on bidis should increase, and he lays out a rational, detailed plan for how to do so

Tobacco Industry Profile – India
Tobacco Economics in Indonesia

International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease

Tobacco Industry Profile – Indonesia

This overview of the tobacco industry in Indonesia provides a list of popular tobacco brands, ways the tobacco industry advertises their products through promotions and sponsorships, and examples of corporate social responsibility public relations activities.

Transnational Tobacco Companies in Indonesia

Indonesia’s growing cigarette market, large population, high smoking prevalence among men, and highly unregulated market, make the country an attractive business opportunity for international tobacco companies attempting to make up for falling profits in developed markets like the United States and Australia. The powerful presence and nature of transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) in Indonesia increases the threat of the tobacco industry to public health because the companies’ competitive efforts to reach young consumers and female smokers ultimately increase smoking prevalence in markets where they operate.

Kreteks in Indonesia

Kreteks dominate the tobacco market in Indonesia. Over the last four years, transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) like Philip Morris International (PMI) and British American Tobacco (BAT) have aggressively invested in Indonesia’s emerging market by acquiring local kretek manufacturers (HM Sampoerna in 2005 and Bentoel Internasional Investama in 2009, respectively).

The Tobacco Source Book Data to Support a National Tobacco Control Strategy

Produced by the Ministry of Health Republic of Indonesia (March 2004).

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Mexico

International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease provides a comprehensive analysis of the tobacco market in Mexico and the viability of using taxation as a strategy to limit smoking, save lives, and raise tax revenues. (2010)

Mexico: Global Adult Tobacco Survey

In the Mexico, GATS was conducted in 2009 as a household survey of persons 15 years of age and older by Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica (INSP). This report is provided in Spanish.

Tobacco Industry Profile – Latin America
The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Pakistan

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease describes the tobacco situation in Pakistan and makes recommendations for future tobacco tax policy in a country with one of the largest populations of tobacco users in the world.

Prohibition of Smoking and Protection of Non-Smokers Health Ordinance, 2002
Tobacco Industry in Pakistan

This article from the Pakistan and Gulf Economist highlights the important role tobacco plays in the economics of Pakistan.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in the Philippines

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease illustrates how raising tobacco excise taxes and prices is an effective tool to reduce tobacco use and prevalence and should be an important component of the overall tobacco control environment to reduce the smoking rate in the Philippines, one of the largest consumers of tobacco in the Western Pacific Region.

Alcohol and Tobacco Products Tax Increase, Republic Act No. 9334
Philippines: Global Adult Tobacco Survey

The 2009 Philippines Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), was a nationally representative household survey of all non-institutionalized men and women aged 15 years and older, designed to produce internationally comparable data on tobacco use and tobacco control measures using a standardized questionnaire, sample design, data collection, and management procedures.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Poland

The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease illustrates how raising tobacco excise taxes and prices is an effective tool to reduce tobacco use and prevalence and should be an important component of the overall tobacco control environment to reduce Poland’s high adult and youth tobacco use prevalence.

Curbing Tobacco Use in Poland

A case study describing efforts to reduce smoking in Poland, which had the highest rate of smokers in the world in the 1980s.

Poland: Global Adult Tobacco Survey

Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), conducted in Poland in years 2009-2010, was a nationally representative household survey of tobacco use among men and women aged 15 and older. The survey was designed to produce internationally comparable data on tobacco use and tobacco control measures through use of a standardized questionnaire, sample design, and data collection and management procedures.

Concept of creation of a public policy on combating tobacco consumption from 2010-2015

The Concept of creation of a public policy on combating tobacco consumption from 2010-2015 (hereinafter- Concept) was developed in accordance with article 5 of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (hereinafter- Convention).The goal is the creation of the conditions for the protection of the health of Russians from the effects of the consumption of tobacco and the impact of tobacco smoke by implementing measures aimed at reducing the consumption of tobacco and reducing its impact on people.

Economics of Tobacco Taxation in Russia

Tobacco-related diseases are responsible for between 330,000 and 400,000 premature deaths in Russia each year and contribute substantially to the country’s declining life expectancy and population decrease.The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease examines the potential of using cigarette taxation as an effective tobacco control measure to reverse these unfavorable trends, taking into account Russian historical and socioeconomic perspectives.

Tobacco Industry Profile – Russia
Thailand: 2011 Global Adult Tobacco Survey

The Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), 2011 in Thailand was a nationally representative household survey of all non‐institutionalized men and women aged 15 years old, designed to produce internationally comparable data on tobacco use and tobacco control measures using a standardized questionnaire, sample design, data collection and management procedures.

Thailand: 2009 Global Adult Tobacco Survey

The Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), 2009 in Thailand was a nationally representative household survey of all non‐institutionalized men and women aged 15 years old, designed to produce internationally comparable data on tobacco use and tobacco control measures using a standardized questionnaire, sample design, data collection and management procedures.

Turkey: 2010 Global Adult Tobacco Survey

To effectively monitor the tobacco epidemic, the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) was conducted in Turkey as a nationally representative household survey of persons 15 years of age and older using a consistent and standard protocol. This report provides an in-depth analysis and reviews of the findings from the survey in light of tobacco control policies and proposes recommendations for future action.

The Economics of Tobacco and Tobacco Taxation in Turkey

This report describes the tobacco taxation in Turkey, evaluates its potential impact on reducing tobacco use and generating revenue.

Ukraine: Global Adult Tobacco Survey

This report presents the results of the GATS, which collected data in Ukraine in late 2009 and early 2010. Discussion of the report results and the recommendations presented are based on the six major strategies in overcoming the tobacco epidemic, the WHO MPOWER.

Economics of Tobacco Taxation in Ukraine

This report describes the tobacco taxation in Ukraine, evaluates its potential impact on reducing tobacco use and generating revenue.

Tobacco Industry Profile – Ukraine
Vietnam: Global Adult Tobacco Survey

The Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) Vietnam 2010 helps Vietnam monitor its smoking prevalence and related factors. The survey results will assist the Ministry of Health, the country’s primary agency for tobacco control, in evaluating the impact of the ten-year implementation of Resolution No. 12/2000/NQ-CP on the National Tobacco Control Policy and provide more evidence to develop tobacco control policies in the future.

Tobacco Taxation in Vietnam

This report describes the tobacco taxation in Vietnam, evaluates its potential impact on reducing tobacco use and generating revenue.

Putting the FCTC Article 6 Guidelines to Work

This presentation explains the WHO FCTC Article 6 Guidelines for non-technical audiences and provides tips on how to use the Guidelines for advocacy.

Map of Countries and Ratification Status

A list of countries as of 21 June 2011 that have ratified the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, prepared by the Framework Convention Alliance.

Framework Convention Alliance: Illicit Trade

Policy papers and recommendations for the FCTC illicit trade protocol from the Framework Convention Alliance.

The Chinese Tobacco Market and Industry Profile

The Chinese government plays conflicting roles in China’s tobacco sector, as both owner and regulator of the industry. The government is mandated to oversee the growth of the China National Tobacco Corporation (CNTC), the world’s single largest producer of cigarettes. At the same time, it has a responsibility to protect public health by reducing tobacco use and tobacco smoke exposure, according to China’s obligations under the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).

Philip Morris International Website
The Chinese Tobacco Market and Industry Profile
British American Tobacco Website
British American Tobacco’s African Foot Print

BAT is the second largest tobacco company in the world and is dominant in sub-Saharan Africa. This report by Action on Smoking and Health documents the social, economic, health and environmental impact of BAT’s activity in Africa.

Tobacco Industry Profile – India
China National Tobacco Corporation and Philip Morris International’s Partnership

In 2005, PMI and the China National Tobacco Import and Export Group Corp. (CNTIEGC) established a 50-50 joint venture to offer a range of Chinese brands on the global market, expand the export of tobacco products and tobacco materials from China and explore other business opportunities.

Tobacco Industry Profile – Indonesia

This overview of the tobacco industry in Indonesia provides a list of popular tobacco brands, ways the tobacco industry advertises their products through promotions and sponsorships, and examples of corporate social responsibility public relations activities.

Transnational Tobacco Companies in Indonesia

Indonesia’s growing cigarette market, large population, high smoking prevalence among men, and highly unregulated market, make the country an attractive business opportunity for international tobacco companies attempting to make up for falling profits in developed markets like the United States and Australia. The powerful presence and nature of transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) in Indonesia increases the threat of the tobacco industry to public health because the companies’ competitive efforts to reach young consumers and female smokers ultimately increase smoking prevalence in markets where they operate.

Kreteks in Indonesia

Kreteks dominate the tobacco market in Indonesia. Over the last four years, transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) like Philip Morris International (PMI) and British American Tobacco (BAT) have aggressively invested in Indonesia’s emerging market by acquiring local kretek manufacturers (HM Sampoerna in 2005 and Bentoel Internasional Investama in 2009, respectively).

Tobacco Industry Profile – Latin America
Tobacco Industry Profile – Russia
Imperial Tobacco Website
Tobacco Industry Profile – Ukraine
Behind the Smoke: A Look at the Tobacco Industry in Chile

Educación Popular en Salud (EPES) conducted a survey among Chile’s 2009 Presidential candidates to determine and publicize their tobacco control policy platforms. This report aims to contextualize the candidates’ proposals in regards to the one actor who did not respond to the survey: the tobacco industry. It reviews, in the context of the election, links to political power and limits on regulation and transparency that constitute a curtain of smoke to be dispelled.

Tobacco Industry Front Group: The International Tobacco Growers’ Association

The tobacco industry has a history of using front groups like the ITGA to undermine the creation and prevent the passage of strong tobacco control laws. For the past thirty years, the ITGA has represented the interests of international tobacco companies, not the livelihoods and well-being of tobacco farmers. Currently the ITGA is increasing lobbying efforts to block passage and implementation of strong tobacco control policies in country as well as the development of FCTC Guidelines.

The Truth About the International Tax and Investment Center (ITIC)

The International Tax and Investment Center (ITIC), founded in 1993, claims to be an independent, nonprofit research and education foundation working to bring together governments and investors on tax and investment policy worldwide. This document uncovers the truth about the ITIC which is funded by major multinational corporations including all of the leading transnational tobacco companies.

Tobacco industry interference with tobacco control

In this report, the World Health Organization exposes and describes the spectrum of tobacco industry practices that interfere with tobacco control. WHO also provides background and contextual information that may assist in implementing the Article 5.3 guidelines against tobacco industry interference with tobacco control.

Lessons in Legislative Manipulation From the Tobacco Industry

Tobacco industry documents show exactly how corporations can and do co-opt legislative processes from start to finish, and how successful they are at it. Big Tobacco’s success at staving off regulation shows its ability to control legislative processes. The tobacco industry’s pioneering work in this area has drawn a road map for other industries showing how to manipulate state and federal legislatures as well.

Designed for Addiction

This report describes key ways in which tobacco companies design and manipulate their products to attract new youth smokers, create and sustain addiction, mislead consumers to think that they are reducing their risk of disease and make it more difficult for users to quit. In addition, as the latest Surgeon General’s report found, the design changes during the past 50 years have also made cigarettes even more dangerous.

Tobacco Free Initiative Monitoring Page

Understanding the tobacco industry’s practices is crucial for the success of tobacco control policies. In recognition of this reality, TFI, following WHO’s Member States’ mandate, is monitoring and drawing global attention to the activities and practices of the tobacco industry.

Monitoring the tobacco industry

Reports and publications from the World Health Organization (WHO) on monitoring the tobacco industry.

Philippines’ Article 5.3 Policy